Archive Monthly Archives: December 2018

Motherboard and Processor

The best CPU for gaming

Getting the best CPU for gaming that you can afford is a good investment. While the price of a new CPU might be intimidating, and yet another expense, it's also at the heart of any gaming PC build and will likely stay with you while you upgrade other parts of your rig. It's also vital for the performance of other apps, outside of play, and having the best CPU for gaming will also cover the programs you use day to day. It's vital if you're multi-tasking too, so a good PC for streaming or recording footage needs a great CPU inside it.

The best CPUs for gaming come from either Intel or AMD, who continue to totally dominate the CPU landscape. The newest and most powerful CPU is the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX, which brings 32 cores and and 64 threads with it (along with quite a hefty $2000 pricetag too). For anyone looking for a good, solid, not too expensive CPU for a gaming build, we'd recommend either the Intel i5-8600K, or the Ryzen 5 2600X, although the Intel chips are generally better for gaming. If you're looking for a PC that handles other usage as well as gaming, you may need a slightly faster chip like the Ryzen 7, especially if budget is an issue.

1. Intel Core i9-9900K

The fastest processor for games, streaming, and more

Cores: 8 | Threads: 16 | Base Clock: 3.6GHz | Turbo Clock: 5.0GHz | Overclocking: Yes, 4.9-5.0GHz typical | L3 Cache: 16MB | TDP: 95W | PCIe 3.0 lanes: 16

2. Intel Core i7-9700K

Excellent gaming performance at a lower price

Cores: 8 | Threads: 8 | Base Clock: 3.6GHz | Turbo Clock: 4.9GHz | Overclocking: Yes, 4.9-5.1GHz typical | L3 Cache: 12MB | TDP: 95W | PCIe 3.0 lanes: 16

3. Intel Core i7-8700K

The previous gen king is still a great choice

Cores: 6 | Threads: 12 | Base Clock: 3.7GHz | Turbo Clock: 4.7GHz | Overclocking: Yes, 4.9-5.0GHz typical | L3 Cache: 12MB | TDP: 95W | PCIe 3.0 lanes: 16

4. Intel Core i5-8400

The best mainstream CPU: great performance and a great price

Cores: 6 | Threads: 6 | Base Clock: 3.8GHz | Turbo Clock: 4.0GHz | Overclocking: No | L3 Cache: 9MB | TDP: 65W | PCIe 3.0 lanes: 16

5. AMD Ryzen 5 2600X

Our favorite AMD CPU, with six cores and great performance at a bargain price

Cores: 6 | Threads: 12 | Base Clock: 3.6GHz | Turbo Clock: 4.2GHz | Overclocking: Yes, 4.1GHz typical | L3 Cache: 16MB | TDP: 65W | PCIe 3.0 lanes: 20

latest technology for 2018

7 Technology Trends That Will Dominate 2018

Regardless of whether you’re a diehard tech fanatic, always after the latest devices, or a laid-back “average” consumer, if you’re like me, you can’t help but look forward to the tech developments and trends that lie ahead. After a year with surprisingly high sales for smart speakersand virtual reality, as well as the debut of several new phones and tablets, I’ve spent the last several weeks looking ahead to the possible trends that will unfold in 2018.

As a marketer, my perspective often turns to how we can use these new technologies and trends to better communicate and connect with our audiences, but general tech trends hold much more potential than that—they have the capacity to change how we live and interact with each other.

So what will the biggest tech trends of 2018 be, and how will our lives change, accordingly?

1. AI permeation. Artificial intelligence (AI), largely manifesting through machine learning algorithms, isn’t just getting better. It isn’t just getting more funding. It’s being incorporated into a more diverse range of applications. Rather than focusing on one goal, like mastering a game or communicating with humans, AI is starting to make an appearance in almost every new platform, app, or device, and that trend is only going to accelerate in 2018. We’re not at techno-pocalypse levels (and AI may never be sophisticated enough for us to reach that point), but by the end of 2018, AI will become even more of a mainstay in all forms of technology.

2. Digital centralization. Over the past decade, we’ve seen the debut of many different types of devices, including smartphones, tablets, smart TVs, and dozens of other “smart” appliances. We’ve also come to rely on lots of individual apps in our daily lives, including those for navigation to even changing the temperature of our house. Consumers are craving centralization; a convenient way to manage everything from as few devices and central locations as possible. Smart speakers are a good step in the right direction, but 2018 may influence the rise of something even better.

3. 5G preparation. Though tech timelines rarely play out the way we think, it’s possible that we could have a 5G network in place—with 5G phones—by the end of 2019. 5G internet has the potential to be almost 10 times faster than 4G, making it even better than most home internet services. Accordingly, it has the potential to revolutionize how consumers use internet and how developers think about apps and streaming content. 2018, then, is going to be a year of massive preparation for engineers, developers, and consumers, as they gear up for a new generation of internet.

4. Data overload. By now, every company in the world has realized the awesome power and commoditization of consumer data, and in 2018, data collection is going to become an even higher priority. With consumers talking to smart speakers throughout their day, and relying on digital devices for most of their daily tasks, companies will soon have access to—and start using—practically unlimited amounts of personal data. This has many implications, including reduced privacy, more personalized ads, and possibly more positive outcomes, such as better predictive algorithms in healthcare.

5. White collar automation. Is your job likely to be replaced by a machine? How certain are you of that answer? AI has been advancing enough to replace at least some white collar jobs for years; even back in 2013, we had algorithms that could write basic news articles, given sufficient inputs of data. Is 2018 going to be the year all humans are finally replaced by their new robot overlords? Almost certainly not, but I do think we’ll see the fledgling beginnings of radical job transformations throughout the United States. I think it’s naïve to think that jobs will be fully replaced, but they will be more heavily automated, and we’ll have to adapt our careers accordingly.

6. Seamless conversation. A few years ago, voice search was decent, but unreliable. Today, voice search might as well be flawless; Microsoft’s latest test gives its voice recognition software a 5.1 percent error rate, making it better at recognizing speech than human transcribers. Similarly, robotic speech and chatbots are growing more sophisticated. In 2018, with these improvement cycles continuing, I imagine we’ll see the manifestation or solidification of seamless conversation. We’ll be able to communicate with our devices, both ways, without any major hiccups or mistakes.

7. UI overhauls. I also think 2018 is going to be a major year for UI; we’re going to have to rethink how we interact with our apps and devices. The onset of smart speakers and better voice search has made it so it’s no longer necessary to look at a screen to input data. Desktop devices are becoming less and less used as well, with mobile continuing to take over. New types of visuals and more audible clues will likely be included in next-generation UI, and consumers will adapt to them quickly, so long as they serve their core needs.

It’s hard to say how fast these trends will manifest, or what types of devices and upgrades will dictate their development, but I’m confident we’ll see increased exposure on all these fronts as 2018 develops.

Regardless of how you feel about technology, or your primary motivations for using it, I think we can all be excited about the new gadgets and infrastructure that await us next year.

The Health Benefits and Risks of Dark Chocolate

Do you love chocolate? What if you could eat it every day for your health? Eating chocolate every day might sound too good to be true, but research shows that there are some excellent health gains associated with eating dark chocolate. There are, however, also some potential risks.

Before we look at the health benefits and risks of dark chocolate, let’s take a look at how dark chocolate is made.

The Effects of Jogging Every Day

With its gentler pace -- about 4 to 5 miles per hour -- jogging is a great alternative to running. Because it's easier on the body than running, you could do it every day without injury.

Daily jogging sessions do more than aid weight loss and improve cardiovascular fitness; they can also lengthen your life, ward off sickness and improve your mental state. Just remember not to overdo it or you'll risk effects of overtraining.


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